forever falling

interests (random selection): vampires (real ones), queer issues, epistemology, horror (watching/writing), writing, fire (worship), otherkin, sci-fi (reading), bdsm (feral pet), unusual movies, identity construction, body modification, sewing…
i am vegan, a sober addict, trans, a black swan, pan and poly, a redhead, a dragon, pagan (non-denominational animist), a freak, a lover, uncategorisable.
ask me things.
things i liked.

April 17, 2014 at 10:12pm
46 notes
Reblogged from snarkopticon

snarkopticon:

Things to do when you take off your corset:

  • Deep breathing. Inhale slowly as deeply as you can, take a few extra sips of breath to make sure you’re fully inflating your lungs, and then exhale slowly. Repeat until your lungs feel happy and your tummy feels calm.
  • Stretching. Back bends, forward bends, side-to-side spinal rotations, etc. Cracking your back and stretching your spine after a long day laced-up is the best feeling.
  • Foot care. Exfoliate, moisturize, trim & paint your toenails. Don’t neglect your tootsies just because you can’t always reach them.
  • Admire your bare tummy. Doesn’t matter if it’s firm and muscular, soft and expansive, or anything in between. It’s yours and it’s adorable.

(via waistedlives)

4:21pm
11,539 notes
Reblogged from dynamicafrica

medievalpoc:

dynamicafrica:

"The Untold Renaissance": Ikire Jones Spring/Summer 2014 Lookbook.

It’s all dapper hommes, suave strides and bold prints and patterns in Nigerian designer Wale Oyejide’s Spring/Summer 2014 lookbook for his brand Ikire Jones.

“This collection pays homage to 18th century textiles and tapestries while exploring the absence of persons of color in Medieval and Renaissance-era European art.  Borrowing from the sampling method employed in hip hop culture, each reinvented piece tells an original narrative from the perspective of Africans who have been placed in an alien context.  Through this reverse lens to the past, the present circumstances of individuals who feel displaced and alienated may also be considered.”

Contemporary Art Week!

I absolutely love the concept behind this. Especially: “reverse lens to the past”.

official website

April 15, 2014 at 5:54pm
35,300 notes
Reblogged from benigoat
indefenseofplants:


Time-lapse of river changing course over 28 years.

Rivers are not static entities!

indefenseofplants:

Time-lapse of river changing course over 28 years.

Rivers are not static entities!

(Source: reddit.com, via styrm)

April 14, 2014 at 11:57pm
19,562 notes
Reblogged from sandandglass

gothiccharmschool:

Something to do when the weather warms up a bit. 

(Source: sandandglass, via styrm)

11:55am
655 notes
Reblogged from thotyouknew

Anonymous asked: dont you worry abt stds and stuff? you probably have something...

thotyouknew:

Whenever I tell someone I’m an escort, this question always seems to come up first. “Don’t you worry about STDs? Are you clean?” I like to ask them, first, “When was the last time you got tested for STIs?” 9 times out of goddamn 10, their answer is not recently by any means, if they even have one. The last guy I was dating who I told and who asked told me he’d never, ever been tested for STDs. He tried to fuck me bareback, and you know I’m not the first, who knows where he’s been sticking his dick in 29 years. 29 years!

It’s funny how you can fuck a hundred randomers in a bar, some of them bare, and never once ask “are you clean?” as if you’re the first person they ever fucked, but, the first thing you ask a low-volume hooker is about the state of my sexual health. Fuck is up with that?

Of course I’m worried about STIs. Are you? Do you use protection every single time there could be fluids exchanged, do you get tested every three weeks, do you make sure to pee and clean yourself immediately after every encounter? Do you examine all your partners for any weird bumps or symptoms before letting them near you? No? 

YOU probably have something.

April 13, 2014 at 1:01am
178,798 notes
Reblogged from 4gifs
boxed-naga:

fuzzykitty01:

Can’t tell if Disney Princess or supreme overlord of evil.

This is the cutest thing I’ve ever seen

Wir sind die Nacht! :D

boxed-naga:

fuzzykitty01:

Can’t tell if Disney Princess or supreme overlord of evil.

This is the cutest thing I’ve ever seen

Wir sind die Nacht! :D

(Source: ForGIFs.com, via styrm)

12:34am
258 notes
Reblogged from medievalpoc
medievalpoc:

Unknown Artists (Palermo)
The Mantle of Roger II of Sicily and the Holy Roman Emperors
Sicily (1133-1134)

This large semi-circular cape – a common form in the mediaeval period for ceremonial mantles – is one of a whole batch of luxurious clothes made between the twelfth and fourteenth centuries in Sicily by craftsmen of Arab origin. Some are dated. 
Arriving in Germany by marriage or inheritance at the very beginning of the thirteenth century, they were very quickly used for the coronations of emperors of the Germanic Roman Holy Empire. Initially preserved in  Aix-la-Chapelle (it is believed that the cape once belonged to Charlemagne), then, from 1424 to the end of the eighth century in Nuremburg, they finally entered the treasury of the Vienna Kunsthistorisches Museum in 1801.
The decoration of the back of the cape, in monumental mirror form, is in gold on a red background, detailed in red, light blue, yellow, dark brown or in reserve. It is entirely underlined with two rows of little pearls (several hundreds of thousands). Backing on to either side of a date-palm there are two couples of animals displaying the antique theme of the predator seizing its prey: a lion, with head proudly held high and tail curving up above its back to meet a half palm leaf, curves punctuated with rosettes broad-leaved foliage, crushing and holding a dromedary in it is powerful claws. If the different unrealistic details emphasising the anatomy of the animals were already common in the tenth century, others (lions claws, the hairs on the lips of the dromedary for example) are very realistic as well as the execution of volumes and the tension which emerges from the attack. While contemporary mantels offer repeated decorations on a small scale, this one, on the contrary was designed as a powerful symbol of the victory of the Norman Hauteville dynasty, whose emblem is a lion, over the Arabs. 
Because of its date, the cape cannot have been used at the coronation of Roger II (1130). Perhaps it was created for a particular occasion? The upper border of the item (which appears on its front when it is worn) is embroidered with a frieze of quatrefoils furnished with a lily alternating with golden lozenges. Behind the head of the lions, two circular broaches in goldsmith’s art, decorated with star-shaped rosettes are at the centre of a quatrefoil enriched with gems set in the claws; with two small “rings” in gold encrusted with rubies set on either side of the collar, these would fasten the mantle.
The inside of the cape is lined with different bits of material with diverse techniques and decorations. Several are ornamented with snakelike dragons whose bodies knot to form openings which frame isolated characters, knights, animals and “candelabra” trees. The way in which these dragons are crafted, with heads which face or back onto each other, evokes the decorations sculpted in stucco and stone of several edifices, or painted on the ceramics of the Seljuq and Ayyubid eras. On one of these materials, large ribbons draw lozenge shaped frames and semi-lozenge shaped frames in degree which enclose trees with parallel branches, two of which are longer and finish in dragons heads (?) which stand up, with leaves that are all downturned displaying birds heads; in the lozenge shaped frames, this tree is flanked by two moving women. Similar decorations can be found on other textile attributed to Sicily and even evoke the glazed ornate cup of the “bird tree” at the Louvre.
This unique item of clothing, by the extraordinary finesse of its creation, its decoration and its inscription, perfectly illustrates the luxury of the court of Roger II and the successful symbiosis of the savoir-faire and decorative themes of the Islamic Orient and Christian Sicily.

[x] [x]

This is beautiful! And it makes me want to look at the mantles won from the dukes of burgundy by the swiss at the end of the 15th century and on display in the castle of gruyeres. As a kid i used to see these mantles and ignored them in favour of *castle!*, but these days i remember the mantles and want to study them more closely.

medievalpoc:

Unknown Artists (Palermo)

The Mantle of Roger II of Sicily and the Holy Roman Emperors

Sicily (1133-1134)

This large semi-circular cape – a common form in the mediaeval period for ceremonial mantles – is one of a whole batch of luxurious clothes made between the twelfth and fourteenth centuries in Sicily by craftsmen of Arab origin. Some are dated.

Arriving in Germany by marriage or inheritance at the very beginning of the thirteenth century, they were very quickly used for the coronations of emperors of the Germanic Roman Holy Empire. Initially preserved in  Aix-la-Chapelle (it is believed that the cape once belonged to Charlemagne), then, from 1424 to the end of the eighth century in Nuremburg, they finally entered the treasury of the Vienna Kunsthistorisches Museum in 1801.

The decoration of the back of the cape, in monumental mirror form, is in gold on a red background, detailed in red, light blue, yellow, dark brown or in reserve. It is entirely underlined with two rows of little pearls (several hundreds of thousands). Backing on to either side of a date-palm there are two couples of animals displaying the antique theme of the predator seizing its prey: a lion, with head proudly held high and tail curving up above its back to meet a half palm leaf, curves punctuated with rosettes broad-leaved foliage, crushing and holding a dromedary in it is powerful claws. If the different unrealistic details emphasising the anatomy of the animals were already common in the tenth century, others (lions claws, the hairs on the lips of the dromedary for example) are very realistic as well as the execution of volumes and the tension which emerges from the attack. While contemporary mantels offer repeated decorations on a small scale, this one, on the contrary was designed as a powerful symbol of the victory of the Norman Hauteville dynasty, whose emblem is a lion, over the Arabs.

Because of its date, the cape cannot have been used at the coronation of Roger II (1130). Perhaps it was created for a particular occasion? The upper border of the item (which appears on its front when it is worn) is embroidered with a frieze of quatrefoils furnished with a lily alternating with golden lozenges. Behind the head of the lions, two circular broaches in goldsmith’s art, decorated with star-shaped rosettes are at the centre of a quatrefoil enriched with gems set in the claws; with two small “rings” in gold encrusted with rubies set on either side of the collar, these would fasten the mantle.

The inside of the cape is lined with different bits of material with diverse techniques and decorations. Several are ornamented with snakelike dragons whose bodies knot to form openings which frame isolated characters, knights, animals and “candelabra” trees. The way in which these dragons are crafted, with heads which face or back onto each other, evokes the decorations sculpted in stucco and stone of several edifices, or painted on the ceramics of the Seljuq and Ayyubid eras. On one of these materials, large ribbons draw lozenge shaped frames and semi-lozenge shaped frames in degree which enclose trees with parallel branches, two of which are longer and finish in dragons heads (?) which stand up, with leaves that are all downturned displaying birds heads; in the lozenge shaped frames, this tree is flanked by two moving women. Similar decorations can be found on other textile attributed to Sicily and even evoke the glazed ornate cup of the “bird tree” at the Louvre.

This unique item of clothing, by the extraordinary finesse of its creation, its decoration and its inscription, perfectly illustrates the luxury of the court of Roger II and the successful symbiosis of the savoir-faire and decorative themes of the Islamic Orient and Christian Sicily.

[x] [x]

This is beautiful! And it makes me want to look at the mantles won from the dukes of burgundy by the swiss at the end of the 15th century and on display in the castle of gruyeres. As a kid i used to see these mantles and ignored them in favour of *castle!*, but these days i remember the mantles and want to study them more closely.

April 12, 2014 at 9:36pm
7 notes
Reblogged from twistmalchik

twistmalchik:

I don’t really understand the anti-self-diagnosis. I’m trying to figure out where they’re coming from, but I don’t get it.

I was diagnosed with OCD at 13. I became one of the card carrying mentally ill before I started high school. I started to show symptoms of OCD at 8. My ASD has been apparent since toddlerhood, although undiagnosed until my 20s. It’s really not that exciting being crazy. So why the gatekeeping?

It seems quite hegemonic. We need old, white, rich people to tell us something before it can be real.

Let me tell you a secret: diagnostic labels are useful in 3 situations.
3) Identity and community building
2) Universalization of treatment protocols.
1) Billing.

The only reason that old white men from the upper-class get to look at you over their Freud-boner is because insurance companies (read old white men) say so.

What about treatment protocols? They are important, but they overlap significantly between the diagnoses created by the dominant school of thought. What is useful for OCD is useful for depression is useful for social phobia. So how useful are diagnoses here really?

The one that the system doesn’t want us to know about is identity and community building. This is exactly what the anti-self-diagnosis crowd doesn’t understand. We know that people in communities— people with support systems— cope better with almost any kind of illness.

Do you see where this is going? A mental health system with largely inaccessible gatekeepers (expensive psychiatric care), abusive practices, arbitrary but sacred labels… It almost seems like it is purposeful. Who do you think is self-diagnosing anyway? It’s young people, poor people, people of color, people in rural areas, abuse victims, people who are disabled.

I get it now. Anti-self-diagnosis is a silencing tactic.

In a world where at least 1 in 4 people will have a psychiatric condition (diagnosible by the whitecoats), we’re shutting up the people who already have the least agency in order to empower the ruling class.

[While I examine the hegemonic nature of the mental health system here, I am fully participatory in it. I can access care, through my ability to access the people who labeled me. I am by no means saying that we shouldn’t receive treatment— only suspicious of those who would condemn those who cannot.]

5:23pm
73 notes
Reblogged from cobbleshock
cobbleshock:

Dingle peninsular with my brother

whaa!!! i rode on that road on a bike in 2003, and i was sure that i recognised it, and then i scrolled down and it is the same place!
we had a storm on that stretch of the road, but afterwards it cleared up and we had beautiful views.

cobbleshock:

Dingle peninsular with my brother

whaa!!! i rode on that road on a bike in 2003, and i was sure that i recognised it, and then i scrolled down and it is the same place!

we had a storm on that stretch of the road, but afterwards it cleared up and we had beautiful views.

(via zombizombi)

3:16pm
84,936 notes
Reblogged from wild-guy
charlesoberonn:

mildlyanxiousatthedisco:

sirenknights:

zooophagous:

"NOM!"

It’s so cuuuuuute!!!

it’s trying to disolve that finger for nourishment

Even cuter.

charlesoberonn:

mildlyanxiousatthedisco:

sirenknights:

zooophagous:

"NOM!"

It’s so cuuuuuute!!!

it’s trying to disolve that finger for nourishment

Even cuter.

(Source: wild-guy, via styrm)